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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Peacenet
    Peacenet Go to the previous next section Peacenet To send mail to a Peacenet user use this form username igc org Peacenet subscribers can use your regular address to send

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_62.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Prodigy
    Extended Guide to the Internet Prodigy Go to the previous next section Prodigy userID prodigy com Note that Prodigy users must pay extra for Internet e mail Go to the

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_63.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Seven UNIX Commands
    ll get an error message If you re used to working on a Mac you ll have to remember that Unix stores files in directories rather than folders Unix directories are organized like branches on a tree At the bottom is the root directory with sub directories branching off that and sub directories in turn can have sub directories The Mac equivalent of a Unix sub directory is a folder within another folder cat Equivalent to the MS DOS type command To pause a file every screen type cat file more better more file where file is the name of the file you want to see Hitting control C will stop the display You can also use cat for writing or uploading text files to your name or home directory similar to the MS DOS copy con command If you type cat test you start a file called test You can either write something simple no editing once you ve finished a line and you have to hit return at the end of each line or upload something into that file using your communications software s ASCII protocol To close the file hit control D cd The change directory command To change from your present directory to another type cd directory and hit enter Unlike MS DOS which uses a to denote sub directories for example stuff text Unix uses a for example stuff text So to change from your present directory to the stuff text sub directory you would type cd stuff text and then hit enter As in MS DOS you do not need the first backslash if the subdirectory comes off the directory you re already in To move back up a directory tree you would type cd followed by enter Note the space between the cd

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_64.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Wildcards
    can use wildcards if you are not sure of the file s exact name ls man would find the following files manual manual txt man o man Use a question mark when you re sure about all but one or

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_65.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - When things go wrong II
    to a non Internet network You call up your host system s text editor to write a message or reply to one and can t seem to get out If it s emacs try control X control C in other words hit your control key and your X key at the same time followed by control and C If worse comes to worse you can hang up In Elm you accidentally hit the D key for a message you want to save Type the number of the message hit enter and then U which will un delete the message This works only before you exit Elm once you quit the message is gone You try to upload an ASCII message you ve written on your own computer into a message you re preparing in Elm or Pine and you get a lot of left brackets capital Ms Ks and Ls and some funny looking characters Believe it or not your message will actually wind up looking fine all that garbage is temporary and reflects the problems some Unix text processors have with ASCII uploads But it will take much longer for your upload to finish One way to deal with

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_66.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - E-Mail FYI
    Hole for an explanation of this term comp mail comp answers and news answers Just to mention a few AppleLink BIX GreeNet MausNet SprintMail etc Get your hands on the inter network guide that s kept on rtfm mit edu in directory pub usenet comp mail See section Advanced E mail or section FTP Mining the Net part II to find out how to access this Internet treasure chest and

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_67.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Global Watering Hole
    Hole The Global Watering Hole The Net surfers s playground Navigating Usenet with nn The new standard nn Commands List of commands with examples Using rn The old standard rn Commands List of commands with examples Essential Newsgroups The answers

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_68.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - The Global Watering Hole
    using one of several specific Net protocols Your host system stores all of its Usenet messages in one place which everybody with an account on the system can access That way no matter how many people actually read a given message each host system has to store only one copy of it Many host systems talk with several others regularly in case one or another of their links goes down for some reason When two host systems connect they basically compare notes on which Usenet messages they already have Any that one is missing the other then transmits and vice versa Because they are computers they don t mind running through thousands even millions of these comparisons every day Yes millions For Usenet is huge Every day Usenet users pump upwards of 40 million characters a day into the system roughly the equivalent of volumes A G of the Encyclopedia Britannica Obviously nobody could possibly keep up with this immense flow of messages Let s look at how to find conferences and discussions of interest to you The basic building block of Usenet is the newsgroup which is a collection of messages with a related theme on other networks these would be called conferences forums boards or special interest groups There are now more than 5 000 of these newsgroups in several diferent languages covering everything from art to zoology from science fiction to South Africa Some public access systems typically the ones that work through menus try to make it easier by dividing Usenet into several broad categories Choose one of those and you re given a list of newsgroups in that category Then select the newsgroup you re interested in and start reading Other systems let you compile your own reading list so that you only see messages

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_69.html (2016-02-14)
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