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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - How it Works
    and maps that will let neophytes get around without getting lost Nobody really knows how many computers and networks actually make up this Net Some estimates say there are now as many as 5 000 networks connecting nearly 2 million computers and more than 15 million people around the world Whatever the actual numbers however it is clear they are only increasing The Net is more than just a technological marvel It is human communication at its most fundamental level The pace may be a little quicker when the messages race around the world in a few seconds but it s not much different from a large and interesting party You ll see things in cyberspace that will make you laugh you ll see things that will anger you You ll read silly little snippets and new ideas that make you think You ll make new friends and meet people you wish would just go away Major network providers continue to work on ways to make it easier for users of one network to communicate with those of another Work is underway on a system for providing a universal white pages in which you could look up somebody s electronic mail address for example This connectivity trend will likely speed up in coming years as users begin to demand seamless network access much as telephone users can now dial almost anywhere in the world without worrying about how many phone companies actually have to connect their calls And today the links grow ever closer between the Internet and such commercial networks as CompuServe and Prodigy whose users can now exchange electronic mail with their Internet friends Some commercial providers such as Delphi and America Online are working to bring their subscribers direct access to Internet services And as it becomes

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_45.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - When things go wrong
    the phone number you typed in If correct turn on your modem s speaker on Hayes compatible modems you can usually do this by typing ATM1 in your communications software s terminal mode If the phone just rings and rings the public access site could be down for maintenance or due to a crash or some other problem If you get a connect message but nothing else try hitting enter

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_46.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Setting up FYI
    of systems that provide public access to Internet services It s availble on the network itself which obviously does you little good if you currently have no access but which can prove invaluable should you move or want to find a new system Look for his PDIAL file in the alt bbs lists or news answers newsgroups in Usenet for information on accessing Usenet see section Usenet the Global Watering Hole Steven Levy s book Hackers Heroes of the Computer Revolution Anchor Press Doubleday 1984 describes the early culture and ethos that ultimately resulted in the Internet and Usenet John Quarterman The Matrix Computer Networks and Conferencing Systems Worldwide Digital Press 1990 is an exhaustive look at computer networks and how they connect with each other You ll find numerous documents about the Internet its history and its resources in the pub Net info directory on the Electronic Frontier Foundation s FTP server see section FTP Mining the Net part II to decipher this FYI on Where to Start A Bibliography of Internetworking Information by Tracy LaQuey Joyce K Reynolds Karen Roubicek Mary Stahl and Aileen Yuan August 1990 is an excellent list of articles books newsletters and other sources

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_47.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Electronic Mail
    ELM Hints on using ELM PINE Hints on using PINE and PICO Smileys Using emoticons to express yourself Seven UNIX Commands MS DOS users can t live without E Mail to other Networks How to reach someone at When things

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_48.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - The Basics
    4 4 pen ident for adamg Sat 15 Jan 1994 20 04 55 0400 ident sender adamg eff org Date Sat 15 Jan 1994 21 34 55 0400 From Adam Gaffin adamg Message Id 199204270134 AA28949 eff org To adamg Subject test Status R This is only a test Whoa What is all that stuff It s your message with a postmark gone mad Just as the postal service puts its marks on every piece of mail it handles so do Net postal systems Only it s called a header instead of a postmark Each system that handles or routes your mail puts its stamp on it Since many messages go through a number of systems on their way to you you will often get messages with headers that seem to go on forever Among other things a header will tell you exactly when a message was sent and received even the difference between your local time and Greenwich Mean Time GMT as at the end of line 4 above If this had been a long message it would just keep scrolling across and down your screen unless the people who run your public access site have set it up to pause every 24 lines One way to deal with a message that doesn t stop is to use your telecommunication software s logging or text buffer function Start it before you hit the number of the message you want to see Your computer will ask you what you want to call the file you re about to create After you name the file and hit enter type the number of the message you want to see and hit enter When the message finishes scrolling turn off the text buffer function The message is now saved in your computer This way you can read the message while not connected to the Net which can save you money if you re paying by the hour and write a reply offline But in the meantime now what You can respond to the message delete it or save it To respond type a lowercase r and hit enter You ll get something like this To adamg Subject Re test Note that this time you don t have to enter a user name The computer takes it from the message you re replying to and automatically addresses your message to its sender The computer also automatically inserts a subject line by adding Re to the original subject From here it s just like writing a new message But say you change your mind and decide not to reply after all How do you get out of the message Hit control C once You ll get this Interrupt one more to kill letter If you hit control C once more the message will disappear and you ll get back to your mail s command line Now if you type a lowercase d and then hit enter you ll delete the original message Type a lowercase q to exit your mailbox If you type a q without first hitting d your message is transferred to a file called mbox This file is where all read but un deleted messages go If you want to leave it in your mailbox for now type a lowercase x and hit enter This gets you out of mail without making any changes The mbox file works a lot like your mailbox To access it type mail f mbox at your host system s command line and hit enter You ll get a menu identical to the one in your mailbox from which you can read these old messages delete them or respond to them It s probably a good idea to clear out your mailbox and mbox file from time to time if only to keep them uncluttered Are there any drawbacks to e mail There are a few One is that people seem more willing to fly off the handle electronically than in person or over the phone Maybe it s because it s so easy to hit R and reply to a message without pausing and reflecting a moment That s why we have smileys see section Smileys There s no online equivalent yet of a return receipt chances are your message got to where it s going but there s no absolute way for you to know for sure unless you get a reply from the other person So now you re ready to send e mail to other people on the Net Of course you need somebody s address to send them mail How do you get it Alas the simplest answer is not what you d call the most elegant you call them up on the phone or write them a letter on paper and ask them Residents of the electronic frontier are only beginning to develop the equivalent of phone books and the ones that exist today are far from complete still later on see section Telnet Mining the Net part I we ll show you how to use some of these directories Eventually you ll start corresponding with people which means you ll want to know how to address mail to them It s vital to know how to do this because the smallest mistake using a comma when you should have used a period for instance can bounce the message back to you undelivered In this sense Net addresses are like phone numbers one wrong digit and you get the wrong person Fortunately most net addresses now adhere to a relatively easy to understand system Earlier you sent yourself a mail message using just your user name This was sort of like making a local phone call you didn t have to dial a 1 or an area code This also works for mail to anybody else who has an account on the same system as you Sending mail outside of your system though will require the use of the Net equivalent

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_49.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - ELM
    n 8 Aug 28 Peter Scott Manage 56 New File DIR019 JANET Public Acces 9 Aug 26 Helen Trillian Ros 15 Tuesday 10 Aug 26 Peter Scott Manage 151 Update CWK004 Oxford University OU You can use any of the following commands by pressing the first character d elete or u ndelete mail m ail a message r eply or f orward mail q uit To read a message press return j move down k move up help Each line shows the date you received the message who sent it how many lines long the message is and the message s subject If you are using VT100 emulation you can move up and down the menu with your up and down arrow keys Otherwise type the line number of the message you want to read or delete and hit enter When you read a message it pauses every 24 lines instead of scrolling until it s done Hit the space bar to read the next page You can type a lowercase r to reply or a lowercase q or i to get back to the menu the I stands for index At the main menu hitting a lowercase m followed by enter will let you start a message To delete a message type a lowercase d You can do this while reading the message Or if you are in the menu move the cursor to the message s line and then hit D When you re done with Elm type a lowercase q The program will ask if you really want to delete the messages you marked Then it will ask you if you want to move any messages you ve read but haven t marked for deletion to a received file For now hit your n key Elm has

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_50.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - PINE
    a message you only have to type in her first name or nickname and pine automatically inserts her actual address The address book also lets you set up a mailing list This feature allows you to send the same message to a number of people at once What really sets pine apart is its built in text editor which looks and feels a lot more like word processing programs available for MS DOS and Macintosh users Not only does it have word wrap a revolutionary concept if ever there was one it also has a rwspell checker and a search command Best of all all of the commands you need are listed in a two line mini menu at the bottom of each screen The commands look like this W Where is The little caret is a synonym for the key marked control on your keyboard To find where a particular word is in your document you d hit your control key and your W key at the same time which would bring up a prompt asking you for the word to look for Some of pine s commands are a tad peculiar control V for page down for example

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_51.html (2016-02-14)
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  • EFF's (Extended) Guide to the Internet - Smileys
    an insult To try to keep such misunderstandings from erupting into bitter disputes we have smileys Tilt your head to the left and look at the following sideways Or simply This is your basic smiley Use it to indicate people should not take that comment you just made as seriously as they might otherwise You make a smiley by typing a colon a hyphen and a right parenthetical bracket Some

    Original URL path: http://web.teipir.gr/eegtti/eeg_52.html (2016-02-14)
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